Exclude directories from Spotlight

Your Mac’s Spotlight application might be one of the most underrated part of the OS X ecosystem. Spotlight indexes all the content on your Mac, making it simple to find documents and data that might be buried deep within your file system.

It’s so fast, I’ve started using it to quickly pull up contact cards. It’s so much more efficient than starting up the Contacts app and digging through people’s names.

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Airmail 2.0 screenshot

The latest version of the  versatile email client, Airmail 2.0, was released recently. I’ve been considering switching from Apple’s default mail app for some time now, and with this new version of Airmail I decided to jump ship.

The problem is, every time you click on a web link in your browser, Mail.app automatically fires itself up. Very irritating! So how do you set up Airmail (or an alternative email client) as your default in Mac OS X?Continue reading

Gmail logo

You might be shocked to learn that Gmail doesn’t offer an official way to block senders. So, what are you supposed to do when you find yourself on an annoying mailing list or circular and there’s no easy way to unsubscribe?

Luckily, Gmail’s filtering system gives you the power to block a sender with a simple rule. Today, we’re going to show you how to do that in a few easy steps. You’ll discover how to set up the rule the first time round, then add additional email addresses that you want to block. Let’s get started:Continue reading

SASS is an amazing CSS preprocessor that allows you to rapidly code websites using nested rules and variables and a lot more.

However, one thing the basic SASS instructions won’t tell you about is how to handle pseudo selectors when you’re nesting your rules. I’m talking about :hover, :before, :after and :visited states. Do you create a whole new CSS rule for a pseudo selector, or is there a way to nest them?

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Apple LogoIf you’re a terminal warrior like me, you’ll occasionally need to reboot the OS X network interface. There’s a quick way to do this through the command line – but first you need to know the identity of your network interface.

Run the ifconfig command in your terminal and find the interface with an IP address attached to it. On my MacBook Pro, the ethernet interface is en0 while the wireless interface is en1.  Yours may be similar.

Shutting down the network interface

Now that you’ve identified the interface, shutting it down and restarting it is a breeze. Run this command:

sudo ifconfig en0 down

And to start things back up again…

sudo ifconfig en0 up

That’s it. It’s a simple command that’s worth remembering – or bookmarking!

WordPress logoMany professional web publishers will opt to split up long posts into multiple pages: it breaks the article down into digestible chunks and also has the added benefit of reducing your site’s bounce rate and keeping readers on your site for longer. (Reducing the bounce rate of your website sends positive signals back to Google about the usefulness of your content.)

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I’ve been messing around with mobile design this weekend. And among some of the mind-bending media queries and  cross device checking, I noticed that when I changed from portrait to landscape orientation on my iPhone, the font size seemed to scale up, upsetting the design.

After Googling around, as you do, I discovered a quick fix for this. It’s probably something that most mobile/responsive designers include as a matter of course these days, but simply adding this Webkit-specific line to your stylesheet fixes the awkward scaling issue when you rotate your phone screen:

body {
	-webkit-text-size-adjust: none;
}

Add the above to your existing body rules, and it’ll clear up orientation change weirdness.

Any other mobile design tips and tricks you want to share? Leave me a comment.

Ubuntu Logo

Ubuntu LogoBy default, Ubuntu 13.04 has a usable guest account. I discovered this yesterday evening when I noticed my daughter had logged on as a guest.

Obviously some of you won’t be comfortable having an accessible guest account on your computer. You’ll be pleased to know there’s an easy way to disable the guest account (and toggle it back on again if you need to).

Instructions

Fire up a terminal session on your Ubuntu machine, then type in the following command and hit Enter.

sudo /usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm-set-defaults -l false

Reversing this process is as simple as changing the false at the end to a true.

sudo /usr/lib/lightdm/lightdm-set-defaults -l true

What this changes

What’s happening in the background when you execute this command? Quite simply, it inserts a line in the /etc/lightdm/lightdm.conf file that says allow-guest=false.

So, the alternative way to make this edit – if you like doing things the long way – is to use gedit or nano to edit the lightdm.conf file and add that line yourself. And obviously switch false to true to re-enable guest access.

Now, once you’ve made the changes, you’ll need to reboot your computer for the guest account to be fully disabled.

Ever need to take a screenshot of what’s on your iPhone or iPad screen? Well, if you’re an IOS novice, you’ll be pleased to know that there’s a built-in shortcut to take a photo of your screen any time you need. No need to buy expensive third-party apps, here’s the simple ‘how-to’ to get you started.

iPhone Screenshot tip

Instructions

As you can see from the image above, it’s a very straightforward process to take a screenshot on your IOS device. Actually, this tip should work on all versions of IOS running on iPod Touch, iPhone and iPad. Here we go:

  • Get the image you want to capture up on your iPhone screen (obviously).
  • Press the power button and the home button on your device simultaneously. You should hear a click like a camera shutter. Your screenshot has been taken.
  • Now, head into the Photos app and you should see the screenshot in your camera roll.
  • That’s it. Pretty simple, huh?

Hope this helped you. If you found this tip useful, do us a favour and share this whereever you normally share stuff!